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SHIDOSHI

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SOKE SAYS...
 
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A BRIEF HISTORY IN TIME

Lance relocated to Arizona's Sun Valley in 2005 from the suburbs of Chicago, Illinois. He and his lovely wife of 8 years had their first child in 2007. Along with being a father, Lance has a background in applied psychology at private psychiatric hospitals as well as years of corporate marketing experience.
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Lance's teaching approach is humble, patient, and understanding while following the traditional teachings of Soke Masaaki Hatsumi and the Bujinkan organization. He has remained committed to his path as a lifelong student through periodic travels to Japan, US-based seminars, and other dojos around the country.
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A SPECIAL THANK YOU

"...While I have had the pleasure of being uke to numerous Shihan, Shidoshi and buyu...I consider Hoban Sensei my most influential American Shihan and Nagato Sensei my most influential Japanese Shihan. Humbly, I consider myself blessed with the training partners I have had. I consider them all valuable teachers worthy of respect and who I feel priveledged to call buyu. They all continue to afford me a well-rounded dichotomy in Budo Taijutsu training through past and/or present training oportunities...".
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RANK IS NOT A REWARD

The SVBD feels rank is not a reward, accomplishment, or purchase. If anything, it is a challenge and responsibility that one eventually grows into instead of earns. The more you train, the more you will realize how little you know. Even as a teacher, one should never stop being a student!
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PERSONAL PHILOSOPHY

Good training does not begin and end in the dojo. It follows you everywhere much like a good upbringing or education. In this light, if you hope to present yourself as the Sistine Chapel, make sure your foundation isn't made of sand. This is why I strongly believe in "basics". They are terrific tools which continue to bare their hidden lessons throughout the life of one's training. While advanced principles and concepts are a part of almost every session, the Kihon Happo and Sanshin No Kata routinely find a place in my training. Basics should never be neglected or outgrown.
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Budo Taijutsu training is a funny thing. The more you train, the more you realize how deep the rabbit hole goes. You believed you were beginning to understand something only to find out there is constantly a bigger picture casting new light on what you thought was already there. This, in part, exemplifies how training is definitely not a destination. You will never "get there" if you are needing to reach something. The road just keeps going. May it never have an end.
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As parting words, I should say; Have no misconceptions, Budo training is a long road. This is something foreign and frustrating to most Americans who find worth in immediate results and gratification. Knowledge is freely given, but lessons tend to reveal themselves when the student is ready. We must all be humble enough to accept this. A Shodan is merely a ticket to begin learning in the Bujinkan and a Shidoshi (Godan and above) is, in essence, only a license to do the same.
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